Tag Archives: sun dried tomatoes

My Nutritarian Diary: Sunny Bean Burgers and Sun-Dried Tomato Basil Spread

Bean Burger Header2This last weekend, I did not want to cook. At all. I was so desperate for something quick and something that tasted “junk-food” yummy, but I wasn’t desperate enough to cave into the full monty by going to a fast food restaurant.

I practiced some restraint and settled for store-bought, low-fat, vegan Boca Burgers and some Alexia 98% Fat Free Roasted Straight Cut Fries with Sea Salt. I found some small 100% whole wheat buns in the discounted baked goods section, and all told, I spent less than $10. Not bad for a weekend craving.

It’s one of those compromises that I often make because it’s 7 p.m., I still don’t have dinner made, and I am going to the store anyway. Thus, packaged “healthy” junk food.

But, what I had really wanted was to make a homemade bean burger that was nutritious and delicious. All was not lost. I did make that the next evening this time serving it with carrot sticks instead of fries. My husband even had a pickle.

Two things that made this weekend junk food so yummy and healthy was I used a Tosca Reno Sun-Dried Tomato Basil Spread (on the Boca Burger, too!). And I found a very nutritious Joel Fuhrman bean burger recipe that was quick to make and tasty.

If you find yourself in a similar situation, here are those recipes.

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Sun-Dried Tomato Basil Spread
(Slightly adapted from “The Eat-Clean Diet Vegetarian Cookbook” by Tosca Reno)

INGREDIENTS:
½ cup vegan mayo
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
¼ cup sun-dried tomatoes, not in oil, rehydrated in hot water and drained
1 handful fresh basil leaves (a must!)
1 clove garlic
¼ teaspoon each sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

DIRECTIONS:
“Place all Sun-Dried Tomato Basil Spread ingredients in a food processor and whirl until thoroughly blended. Spread will be a little chunky. Scrape in a small bowl and refrigerate until ready to use” (Tosca Reno).

Sunny Bean Burgers
(Slightly adapted from “Eat to Live Cookbook” by Joel Fuhrman)

INGREDIENTS:
¼ cup sunflower seeds
1 (15.5 ounce can) kidney or pinto beans, rinsed and drained
½ cup minced green onions
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon old fashioned rolled oats
½ teaspoon chili powder
¼ teaspoon sea salt, optional

DIRECTIONS:
Place a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet.

“Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Chop the sunflower seeds in a food processor or with a hand chopper. Mash the beans in the food processor or with a potato masher and mix with the sunflower seeds. Mix in the remaining ingredients and form into six patties.

Place the patties on the baking sheet and bake for 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly, until you can pick up each patty and compress it firmly in your hands to re-form the burger. Return the patties to the baking sheet, bottom side up, and bake for another 10 minutes” (Joel Fuhrman).

MY NOTES:
You can eat these patties served on a whole-wheat bun with Sun-Dried Tomato Basil Spread (see recipe above) or wrapped in lettuce leaves. Excellent sides are carrot sticks or Alexia 98% Fat Free Roasted Straight Cut Fries with Sea Salt.

My Nutritarian Diary: Vegan Sun-Dried Tomato “Alfredo”

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This Vegan Sun-Dried Tomato “Alfredo” is a wonderful recipe for a few reasons. First, it’s absolutely delicious. The sun-dried tomato flavoring gives this sauce one of the best flavors I’ve tasted since going mostly plant-based in my eating.

Second, it’s so easy to make! I mean the only thing you have to “cook” is the pasta. Really, that’s it. Isn’t that great?

Third, this “alfredo” is better for you than its fat-laden (and yes, I’ll add delicious!) cousins. Using lite silken tofu and cashews helps provide the creamy texture that wonderfully coats the pasta. Cashews are a great alternative to using heavy dairy creams in recipes, and the tofu makes the sauce go further.

Add the sun-dried tomatoes, and you have a dish that packs a nutritional punch of fiber, protein, calcium, antioxidants, and more! And the artichoke hearts are worth a mention, too. They are full of health benefits including aiding digestion, lowering cholesterol, and possessing a high amount of the antioxidant vitamin C.

So, what are you waiting for? Why don’t you give it a try and let me know what you think!

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Vegan Sun-Dried Tomato “Alfredo”
(Adapted from Tosca Reno’s “Penne with No-Cook Sun-Dried Tomato Tofu Cream, Artichoke Hearts and Basil” recipe in The Eat-Clean Diet Vegetarian Cookbook.)

INGREDIENTS:
• 12-16 ounces of pasta of your choice (I used 12-ounces of tri-colored penne pasta)
• 1 (12.3 ounce) package firm lite silken tofu, drained, at room temperature
• ½ cup raw unsalted cashews
• ½ cup hot water
• 1 cup rehydrated sun-dried tomatoes (not in oil), drained
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
• 2 tablespoons chopped basil
• 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (or more, to taste)
• 1 (12 ounce) package frozen artichoke hearts, thawed
• ¼ teaspoon each sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS:
“Bring a large pot of water to boil over high heat and cook the pasta according to package directions until ‘al dente’. Drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking liquid. Do not rinse the pasta. Transfer the pasta to a large bowl.

In a blender (or food processor), blend the tofu, cashews and hot water until very smooth. Add the sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, basil, [nutritional yeast], salt and pepper, and blend until combined, but you can still see little chunks of tomatoes. Pour over the pasta, add the artichoke hearts, and toss to combine. If the sauce is too thick, add the reserved pasta cooking liquid a bit at a time until you reach the desired consistency” (Tosca Reno).

MY NOTES:
The original recipe called for one tablespoon of chopped marjoram, which I didn’t have on hand. Also, I added nutritional yeast to my version for more of a “cheesy” flavor. And Tosca’s name for this recipe was just entirely too long for my blog post title, so that is why I’ve renamed it.

My Nutritarian Diary: Tuscan White Bean Dip

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We all know we are supposed to eat more fruits and vegetables every day. Even the United States Department of Agriculture recommends a significant portion of both on its now three-year-old MyPlate nutritional info graphic.

However, most of us, including me prior to going mostly plant-based in my own eating, actually eat a very small portion of fruits and vegetables as part of our daily diet. Our consumption probably looks something like this: a small cup of juice during breakfast, maybe an apple as part of lunch, and a side salad with our dinner. Instead, we get calories from less than desirable sources and we suffer as a result. We not only deplete our bodies of its nutrients, we don’t even replenish them.

In the plant-based community, there are many suggestions as to how to increase your fruit and vegetable consumption. There are also many ideas about what a plant-based diet should look like.1 But all agree. We should eat more fruits and vegetables and we should all start now.

The best advice I’ve read so far, for myself, has been Joel Fuhrman’s suggestion to try and eat at least one pound of raw vegetables and one pound of cooked vegetables daily, as well as try to eat three fresh fruits a day.

That is not as easy as it may seem, which is why I wanted to give you a recipe this week that will help assist you in eating vegetables—the incredibly healthy and nutrient dense Tuscan White Bean Dip, from Fuhrman’s Eat to Live Cookbook.

1For an excellent comparison of different plant-based diet philosophy’s, I recommend Dr. John McDougall’s August 2012 McDougall Newsletter article, “The Diet Wars: The Time for Unification is Now.” The comparison chart is on the second page of this link. (Accessed online: 6-6-14)

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Tuscan White Bean Dip
(Adapted from Eat to Live Cookbook by Joel Fuhrman / with low-sodium references removed)

INGREDIENTS:
• 1½ cups cooked great northern beans or 1 (15-ounce) can of great northern beans, drained
• ¼ cup pine nuts (I used cashews)
• 2 cloves of garlic, minced
• seasonings, to taste (could be a no-salt seasoning blend or other seasoning blend of your choice)
• 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
• 1 tablespoon fresh, minced rosemary
• ¼ cup rehydrated dried tomatoes, minced

Makes 2½ cups.

DIRECTIONS:
“Place all ingredients, except the dried tomatoes, in a high-powered blender or food processor. Process until smooth and creamy. Adjust seasonings to taste. Stir in the dried tomatoes. Chill for 1 hour before serving” (Fuhrman).

MY NOTES:
Fuhrman says to soak the dried tomatoes in lukewarm water until soft (about 1 to 2 hours). I rehydrated mine with boiling water for 10-15 minutes. His way probably leaves more nutrients in the tomatoes, but I didn’t have that time. I also added some of the tomato soaking water in my dip to help achieve my desired consistency.