My Nutritarian Diary: Peanut Butter Vegetable Soup

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I don’t know about you, but wintertime and the colder temperatures outside make me want to cook soup for dinner, and there is nothing like a nutritious broth, teaming with vegetables that you need to eat up in the fridge, along with a hint of international flavoring, that can make a dinner better—health wise and in taste.

The secret ingredient that makes this particular soup oh-so-yummy is peanut butter. It may sound odd at first, but I promise this recipe does not disappoint. And what it lacks in “looks,” it more than makes up for in taste and nutrition. I added a bit of turmeric, which is a powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant that benefits the whole body. I also added a ¼ cup of lentils to bulk the soup up a biby adding more protein and fiber.

It is extraordinarily filling and it is a great plant-based meal that even your non-plant-based family and friends can enjoy.

So, let’s get cooking!

Peanut Butter Veg Soup Pic

Peanut Butter Vegetable Soup
Recipe adapted from Better Homes and Gardens Vegetarian Recipes Cookbook (1993)

Before I list the ingredients, I thought I would mention that I recommend buying organic items, when possible, especially if they are on the Dirty Dozen list of produce with the most pesticide residue. I generally don’t buy organic if the produce has low pesticide residue or is on the Clean Fifteen list. Both lists can be found here. So, the vegetable broth, the celery, the potato, the diced tomatoes, and the zucchini are items I would recommend buying organic, as they or their ingredients are found on the Dirty Dozen list.

INGREDIENTS:
• 3 stalks celery, sliced
• 2 carrots, chopped
• 1 large onion, chopped
• 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
• 2-4 tbsp vegetable broth or water for sautéing
• 4 cups vegetable broth, low sodium
• 1 potato or root vegetable, diced
• 1 zucchini, sliced
• ¼ cup lentils, optional
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
• ½ tsp turmeric, optional
• 1 14.5-ounce can of diced tomatoes, low sodium
• ½ cup peanut butter, natural with no added sugar or sodium
• ½ tsp of dried parsley or 2 tbsp of fresh, for garnish

DIRECTIONS:
In a large saucepan or Dutch oven, sauté celery, carrots, onion, and garlic in 2-4 tbsp vegetable broth for about 5 minutes or until the onion is tender. Increase vegetable broth 1 tbsp at a time as needed to prevent vegetables from sticking to pan.

Stir in the 4 cups of vegetable broth, the potato (or root vegetable), zucchini, lentils, if using, salt, pepper, and turmeric, if using.

Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Cover and simmer until the potato (or root vegetable) and lentils, if using, are tender, about 15-20 minutes. Stir in can of diced tomatoes and parsley.

In a small bowl, gradually stir in about 1 cup of broth into the peanut butter till smooth. Return to soup. Cook and stir till heated through.

Ladle into soup bowls and enjoy!

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About Cassandra

When I’m not working for FOX 28 and its parent company, Northwest Broadcasting Inc., as an executive assistant, I enjoy spending time reading about and experimenting with low-fat, plant-based recipes. After watching the documentary “Forks Over Knives” and reading the book “Food Over Medicine: A Conversation That Could Save Your Life” by Pamela Popper and Glen Merzer I was totally convinced that I needed to change the way I looked at food and how I ate it. The purpose of My Nutritarian Diary, a www.myfoxspokane.com blog, is to deliver fantastic-tasting and nutrient-dense recipes that are sprinkled with dashes of nutritional wisdom each week for the Health-Conscious, Health-Adventurous, and Health Happy—at whatever stage they are in on their health journey. The term nutritarian was first coined by Dr. Joel Fuhrman, author of #1 New York Times best-selling book “Eat to Live,” and it is how I classify my approach to eating a low-fat and mostly plant-based diet. If you are interested in sponsoring this blog, please contact Katie Vantine at 509-448-2828.

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